When is your manuscript ready? (Part 2)

Following up from a previous post, we thought it would be useful to share some advice from literary agent Carole Blake.

It’s about that next step, about when you have your manuscript ready to query. You may wish to submit a proposal to a literary agent. If so, Carole Blake has some cracking advice on what NOT to do.

Take heed! 

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When is your manuscript ready?

One of the most frustrating questions a writer faces is whether a manuscript is ready.

How many drafts, how many revisions or edits, before you can finally put it aside and say that, yes, it’s ready? Before it’s ready to submit, to publish or share with friends, whatever your desired goal, make sure you follow some simple tips before you send your work out there:

  • Check your spelling and grammar
  • Read your work aloud
  • Seek advice
  • Proofread your work
  • Be consistent

Check your spelling and grammar: This might sound obvious, but be sure. A manuscript littered with simple spelling errors or grammatical nightmares will confuse or turn a reader off. Instantly.

Read your work aloud: This is a fantastic chance to hear the rhythm of your words, and find the awkward spots. You don’t have to perform it – just sitting at your desk and speaking aloud is enough. It’ll give you a chance to make sure the flow of words is natural.

Seek advice: Whether this is professional or not – do seek advice. The kind of feedback you get from someone with fresh eyes is invaluable. You’re too close to your project. Find someone you trust to be honest and listen to what they have to say. It’ll probably be hard the first time, but do it anyway.

Proofread your work: Before you send it off – proof your work in a different context. Print it out, change the device you read it on, even change the font. Changing the way you see your manuscript will bring new errors to light – especially typos or missing letters.

Be consistent: Keep your stylistic choices consistent, such as spelling or formatting. Use US or UK spelling either works – just don’t mix them. Keep an eye on other aspects, like your spacing, capitalisation and font uses, both size and type. Imagine reading a report or an essay where the font size and type changes from ten times on page one.

These are starting points only, there’s a lot more care you can take – and should take – but these steps should make a big difference to your manuscript!